Reviews - Pulp Fiction (1994)
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Pulp Fiction (1994)

Genres: Crime, Drama

Taglines: Girls like me don't make invitations like this to just anyone!

Director: Quentin Tarantino

Writers: Roger Avary, Quentin Tarantino

Stars: Tim Roth, Amanda Plummer, Laura Lovelace, John Travolta, ...

Jules Winnfield (Samuel L. Jackson) and Vincent Vega (John Travolta) are two hit men who are out to retrieve a suitcase stolen from their employer, mob boss Marsellus Wallace (Ving Rhames). Wallace has also asked Vincent to take his wife Mia (Uma Thurman) out a few days later when Wallace himself will be out of town. Butch Coolidge (Bruce Willis) is an aging boxer who is paid by Wallace to lose his fight. The lives of these seemingly unrelated people are woven together comprising of a series of funny, bizarre and uncalled-for incidents.

100

Pulp Fiction isn't just funny. It's outrageously funny. [14 Oct 1994]

100 | Mick LaSalle

It is an exhilaration from beginning to end. It's the movie equivalent of that rare sort of novel where you find yourself checking to see how many pages are left and hoping there are more, not fewer.
Read More: San Francisco Chronicle

100 | Roger Ebert

Like "Citizen Kane," Pulp Fiction is constructed in such a nonlinear way that you could see it a dozen times and not be able to remember what comes next.
Read More: Chicago Sun-Times

100 | James Berardinelli

With this film, every layer that you peel away leads to something deeper and richer. Tarantino makes pictures for movie-lovers, and Pulp Fiction is a near-masterpiece.
Read More: ReelViews

100 | Staff (Not Credited)

The new King Kong of crime movies...Ferocious fun without a trace of caution, complacency or political correctness to inhibit its 154 deliciously lurid minutes.
Read More: Rolling Stone

100 | Rick Groen

Pulp Fiction is at least three movies rolled into one, and they're all scintillating.
Read More: The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

100 | Brad Laidman

The first masterwork of the post-modern pop culture generation...gets better with every viewing, and like good rock n' roll, needs to be played loud!
Read More: Film Threat

100 | Desson Thomson

Brilliant and brutal, funny and exhilarating, jaw-droppingly cruel and disarmingly sweet...To watch this movie (whose 2 1/2 hours speed by unnoticed) is to experience a near-assault of creativity.
Read More: Washington Post

100 | Jonathan Rosenbaum

Tarantino's mock-tough narrative--which derives most of its titillation from farcical mayhem, drugs, deadpan macho monologues, evocations of anal penetration, and terms of racial abuse--resembles a wet dream for 14-year-old male closet queens (or, perhaps more accurately, the 14-year-old male closet queen in each of us), and his command of this smart-alecky mode is so sure that this nervy movie sparkles throughout with canny twists and turns.
Read More: Chicago Reader

100 | Marjorie Baumgarten

Very satisfying. Classic storytelling, modern techniques. And the images: This movie has embedded so many strange and new mental pictures in my head that I'm not able to shake free. Yet, neither would I want to be free.
Read More: Austin Chronicle

100 | Staff (Not credited)

[Tarantino's] ability to take what seem like minor conversational themes and dovetail them onto later exchanges for maximum comic effect is close to genius. And the action can be literally heart-stopping.
Read More: Entertainment Weekly

100 | Philip Thomas

A scintillating piece of filmmaking, the kind of movie you look forward to seeing again even as you're watching it, and an extraordinary response to both the Dogs-Is-Overrated brigade and the He'll-Never-Top-His-Debut sceptics.
Read More: Empire

80 | Staff (Not credited)

Without its commitment to an idea of salvation, Pulp Fiction would be little more than a terrific parlor trick; with it, it's something far richer and more haunting.
Read More: TV Guide Magazine

70 | Rita Kempley

The experience overall is like laughing down a gun barrel, a little bit tiring, a lot sick and maybe far too perverse for less jaded moviegoers.
Read More: Washington Post