Trivia - The Holcroft Covenant (1985)
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The Holcroft Covenant (1985)

Genres: Action, Crime, Drama

Director: John Frankenheimer

Writers: Robert Ludlum, George Axelrod, Edward Anhalt, John Hopkins, ...

Stars: Michael Caine, Anthony Andrews, Victoria Tennant, Lilli Palmer, ...

Noel Holcroft is a foreign-born American citizen working in New York as an architect. In Geneva he meets with a respected Swiss banker who tells him he has been designated to be executor of a huge 4 1/2 billion dollar trust fund designed to make reparations for the war crimes of the Nazis. Holcroft's father, who committed suicide in 1945, was a key Hitler financial advisor who became conscience-stricken about German war atrocities, turned against the Fuehrer, and covertly diverted Nazi funds to a secret Swiss account. Under the terms of the covenant Holcroft must locate the sons of his father's two associates so they can jointly activate their fathers' account. They battle the sinister forces seem to be trying to prevent them from signing the document as it is believed that it will be used to establish a Fourth Reich.
The scene where Michael Caine tells Victoria Tennant that he cannot drive a car was written especially for the actor, who does not drive.
The exterior of the Banque de Geneva was shot in that city, although the entrance was shot in Zurich, the lobby in Berlin, and the vault interior in London.
The voice of Bernie Sussman on Holcroft's answering machine is director John Frankenheimer.
Director John Frankenheimer had Michael Caine use a remote to access the calls on the answering machine, despite the fact that no such device has ever existed. Frankenheimer explained that it freed the actor to be able to move around the room.
The New York scenes, including Michael Caine's apartment and Lilli Palmer's bookstore, were shot in London.
The film was made and released about seven years after its source novel of the same name by Robert Ludlum had been first published in 1978.
The movie started shooting in July 1984.
Michael Caine's co-star in this espionage thriller, Lilli Palmer, had the same Palmer last name as his famous Harry Palmer spy film character.
The character portrayed by actress Victoria Tennant in this film was an amalgam of two characters who were sisters in Robert Ludlum's source novel "The Holcroft Covenant".
Second and final of two movies that actor Richard Münch made with director John Frankenheimer. The first film had been The Train (1964) made and first released about twenty-one years earlier.
Star Billing: Michael Caine received top first billing, Anthony Andrews (2nd) and Victoria Tennant (3rd).
The amount of money in Noel Holcroft (Michael Caine)'s inheritance was US $4 billion.
This 1985 movie featured a character called Herr Oberst (Richard Münch) whose codename was "Oberst" which is a German word which translates from the German language as "Colonel". Coincidentally, released also in 1985 was the German film Oberst Redl (1985)
First of three movies that actor Michael Lonsdale made with director John Frankenheimer. The later films were Ronin (1998) and Riviera (1987).
The movie's opening title card read "Berlin 1945". It's second after the film's opener read "New York 1985".
The name of architect Noel Holcroft (Michael Caine)'s architectural building firm was "Noel Holcroft and Associates".
The picture is set approximately exactly forty years after the end of the Second World War.
The movie's MacGuffin was a World War II era large heavy metal case, embossed with Nazi insignia, and containing the The Holcroft Covenant.
The movie's central lead role of Noel Holcroft was originally written specifically for actor James Caan.
Actor Anthony Andrews sports a mustache in this movie.
The movie featured the word "Verrater" written in blood alongside a Nazi swastika. "Verrater" is a German word that translates into English as "traitor".
Playing Fritzl, actor Guntbert Warns appears in drag in this movie.
The three Nazis seen during the picture's opening sequence were all German actors.
A number of the cars seen in the movie were Mercedes Benz vehicles as director John Frankenheimer happened to especially like the Merc makes and models.
The name of the book shop in Berlin was "Holcroft's Book Store".
On John Frankenheimer's audio-commentary, Frankenheimer doesn't mention the name of the movie's original lead star who was James Caan and only ever refers to him as an American actor.
One of a number of action-thrillers of the 1980s which featured a neo-Nazi story twist element. Others included Alistair MacLean's Bear Island (1979) and River of Death (1989).
Michael Caine stars in this espionage movie where the story-line develops to reveal a scheme by neo-Nazis to establish "The Fourth Reich". One of Caine's next two spy pictures released in 1987 would be called The Fourth Protocol (1987).
The movie's MacGuffin was a World War II era large heavy metal case, embossed with Nazi insignia, and containing the Holcroft Covenant.
The amount of money in Noel Holcroft (Michael Caine)'s inheritance was US $4.5 billion.
This espionage movie featured two actors who had appeared in the James Bond spy film franchise. They were Michael Lonsdale who had played the villain Drax in Moonraker (1979) and Shane Rimmer who played three different characters in three different Bond m
According to Michael Caine's auto-biography "What's It All About?" (1992), Caine said of his role, the "part had originally been given to James Caan and he had dropped out at the last moment, I had to finish Water (1985) on the Friday night, and whizz off
Michael Caine replaced James Caan. Caan walked off the production the day before filming started. John Frankenheimer had to film around his absent lead character until Caine was hired as a replacement. With time on his hands, Frankenheimer shot extra foot
Second ever feature film adaptation of a Robert Ludlum novel and the third Ludlum adaption overall for any filmed production. The Osterman Weekend (1983) had debuted in theaters in 1983 whilst The Rhinemann Exchange (1977) had been made for television in
According to the book 'Onscreen and Undercover: The Ultimate Book of Movie Espionage' (2006) by Wesley Britton, "[Michael] Caine didn't like the film. He signed on because the director was to be John Frankenheimer, the man behind one of Caine's favorite f
The film's opening scenes, set during the end of World War II, were shot in black-and-white, unlike the rest of the movie which was filmed in color. The black-and-white opener reflected newsreels of the era, the sequence also featuring some original b&w a
John Frankenheimer admitted to having a crush on Lilli Palmer when she was appearing on stage in "The Four Poster" in the 1950s and returned to see her numerous times in the play. He confessed his youthful infatuation to her when they worked together on T
Actor Bernard Hepton was cast in this espionage film as Commander Leighton having previously been seen in the television adaptations of 'John le Carre''s spy novels playing Toby Esterhase in both Smiley's People (1982) and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (1979)
This espionage movie featured three actors who had appeared in the James Bond spy film franchise. They were Michael Lonsdale who had played the villain Drax in Moonraker (1979), Shane Rimmer who played three different characters in three different Bond mo
This 1985 movie featured a character called Herr Oberst (Richard Münch) whose codename was "Oberst" which is a German word which translates from the German language as "Colonel". Coincidentally, released also in 1985 was the German film Colonel Redl (1985
According to Michael Caine's auto-biography "What's It All About?" (1992), Caine said of his role, the "part had originally been given to James Caan and he had dropped out at the last moment, I had to finish Water (1985) on the Friday night, and whizz off to Berlin to start filming on the Monday morning. It all happened so quickly that I didn't even have time for a wardrobe fitting and wore my own clothes in the movie. Even more to the point, I didn't have time to read the script properly, and only too late did I realize that I couldn't understand the plot, so God help the poor audience who would eventually see it".
Michael Caine replaced James Caan. Caan walked off the production the day before filming started. John Frankenheimer had to film around his absent lead character until Caine was hired as a replacement. With time on his hands, Frankenheimer shot extra footage of the assassins in the Geneva ferry scene.
John Frankenheimer admitted to having a crush on Lilli Palmer when she was appearing on stage in "The Four Poster" in the 1950s and returned to see her numerous times in the play. He confessed his youthful infatuation to her when they worked together on The Holcroft Covenant (1985) and complimented her beauty despite the actress being in her 70s at the time.
Second ever feature film adaptation of a Robert Ludlum novel and the third Ludlum adaption overall for any filmed production. The Osterman Weekend (1983) had debuted in theaters in 1983 whilst The Rhinemann Exchange (1977) had been made for television in 1977. The picture was the second of three 1980s features based on Ludlum novels, the decade ended with a tele-movie of The Bourne Identity (1988).
According to the book 'Onscreen and Undercover: The Ultimate Book of Movie Espionage' (2006) by Wesley Britton, "[Michael] Caine didn't like the film. He signed on because the director was to be John Frankenheimer, the man behind one of Caine's favorite films, The Manchurian Candidate (1962)...At first, James Caan was to play Holcroft but pulled out at the last minute. Caine was in wardrobe [sic] before he ever saw the script, which he found incomprehensible".
The film's opening scenes, set during the end of World War II, were shot in black-and-white, unlike the rest of the movie which was filmed in color. The black-and-white opener reflected newsreels of the era, the sequence also featuring some original b&w archive footage of a battle, which was inter-cut with the movie's bw filmed footage.
Second of two movies that actor Richard Münch made with director John Frankenheimer. The first film had been The Train (1964) made and first released about twenty-one years earlier.
Actor Bernard Hepton was cast in this espionage film as Commander Leighton having previously been seen in the television adaptations of 'John le Carre''s spy novels playing Toby Esterhase in both Smiley's People (1982) and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (1979).
This espionage movie featured three actors who had appeared in the James Bond spy film franchise. They were Michael Lonsdale who had played the villain Drax in Moonraker (1979), Shane Rimmer who played three different characters in three different Bond movies, they being You Only Live Twice (1967), Diamonds Are Forever (1971) and The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Carl Rigg who played The Imposter in The Living Daylights (1987)_.
This 1985 movie featured a character called Herr Oberst (Richard Münch) whose codename was "Oberst" which is a German word which translates from the German language as "Colonel". Coincidentally, released also in 1985 was the German film Colonel Redl (1985) whose original title was "Oberst Redl".
According to Michael Caine's auto-biography,"What's It All About?" (1992), Caine said of his role, the "part had originally been given to James Caan who dropped out at the last moment. "I had to finish Water (1985) on the preceeding Friday night and whiz off to Berlin to start filming on the following Monday morning. It all happened so quickly, that I didn't even have time for a wardrobe fitting and wore my own clothes in the movie. Even more to the point, I didn't have time to read the script properly and, only too late, did I realize that I couldn't understand the plot, so God help the poor audience who would eventually see it".
The scene where Michael Caine tells Victoria Tennant that he cannot drive a car was written especially for the actor who does not drive.
On Director John Frankenheimer's audio-commentary, he doesn't mention the name of the actor originally cast as the movie's lead, James Caan, and only ever refers to him as an American actor.
Michael Caine replaced James Caan. Caan walked off the production the day before filming started. John Frankenheimer had to film around his absent lead character, until Caine was hired as a replacement. With time on his hands, Frankenheimer shot extra footage of the assassins in the Geneva ferry scene.
The voice of Bernie Sussman on Holcroft's answering machine is John Frankenheimer.
John Frankenheimer had Michael Caine use a remote control to access the calls on the answering machine, despite the fact that no such device has ever existed. Frankenheimer explained that it freed the actor to be able to move around the room.
The exterior of the Banque de Geneva was shot in that city, although the entrance was shot in Zurich, Switzerland, the lobby in West Berlin, Germany, and the vault interior in London, England.
John Frankenheimer admitted to having a crush on Lilli Palmer, when she was appearing on stage in "The Four Poster" in the 1950s, and returned to see her numerous times in the play. He confessed his youthful infatuation to her, when they worked together on The Holcroft Covenant (1985), and complimented her beauty, despite the actress being in her 70s at the time.
The New York City scenes, including Michael Caine's apartment and Lilli Palmer's bookstore, were shot in London, England.
Second of two movies that actor Richard Münch made for John Frankenheimer. The first film had been The Train (1964).
Second feature film adaptation of a Robert Ludlum novel, and the third Ludlum adaption overall for any filmed production. The Osterman Weekend (1983) had debuted in theaters, while The Rhinemann Exchange (1977) had been made for television. The picture was the second of three 1980s features based on Ludlum novels, the decade ended with a television movie The Bourne Identity (1988).
First of three movies that actor Michael Lonsdale made with John Frankenheimer. The later films were Riviera (1987), and Ronin (1998).
The movie's MacGuffin was a World War II-era large heavy metal case, embossed with Nazi insignia, and containing the Holcroft Covenant.
One of several action-thrillers of the 1980s that featured a neo-Nazi story twist element. Others included Alistair MacLean's Bear Island (1979) and River of Death (1989).
According to the book 'Onscreen and Undercover: The Ultimate Book of Movie Espionage' (2006) by Wesley Britton, "(Michael) Caine didn't like the film. He signed on because the director was to be John Frankenheimer, the man behind one of Caine's favorite films, The Manchurian Candidate (1962). At first, James Caan was to play Holcroft, but pulled out at the last minute. Caine was in wardrobe before he ever saw the script, which he found incomprehensible".
The film's opening scenes, set during the end of World War II, were shot in black and white, unlike the rest of the movie which was filmed in color. The black and white opener reflected newsreel footage of the era. The sequence also features some original black and white archival battle footage that was inter-cut with the movie's black and white filmed footage.
The character portrayed by Victoria Tennant in this film, was an amalgam of two characters, who were sisters in the novel.
Actor Bernard Hepton was cast as Commander Leighton, having previously been seen in the television adaptations of John le Carré's spy novels, playing Toby Esterhase, in Smiley's People (1982) and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (1979).
This espionage movie featured three actors who had appeared in the James Bond franchise. They were Michael Lonsdale, who had played the villain Drax in Moonraker (1979), Shane Rimmer, who played three different characters in three different Bond movies, they being You Only Live Twice (1967), Diamonds Are Forever (1971), and The Spy Who Loved Me (1977), and Carl Rigg, who played The Imposter in The Living Daylights (1987).
Several cars seen in the movie were Mercedes-Benzes, as John Frankenheimer happened to especially like the Mercedes-Benz models.
The amount of money in Noel Holcroft's (Michael Caine's) inheritance was 4.5 billion U.S. dollars.
The picture is set approximately forty years after the end of World War II.
The lead role of Noel Holcroft was originally written specifically for James Caan.
The film was made and released seven years after its source novel had been published in 1978.
This film featured a character called "Herr Oberst" (Richard Münch), whose codename was "Oberst", which is a German word which translates as "Colonel". Coincidentally, released also in 1985, was the German film Colonel Redl (1985), whose original title was "Oberst Redl".
Michael Caine's co-star in this espionage thriller, Lilli Palmer, had the same last name as his famous Harry Palmer spy film character.